on the boards

Still in Schematics

Tomorrow's homes are already on the drawing boards, but the materials from which they will be built are nothing like those used in the past. New technologies are reshaping not only the way we design but also the way we will build and live within the homes of tomorrow. Floor plans have changed to reflect the evolving patterns of our lives, forcing even the classicist to turn away from his heavily “compartmentalized” floor plans of old and to embrace wider open spaces with circulation flowing through (not just around) rooms. With that said, quality traditional, and classical homes are still built with natural  materials and always will be.

The projects below are still in the early schematic phase. These designs are still under consideration by their respective clients. They are - 

New Commission  |  Laurel Hall  |  A Shingle Style Manor  |  Medina Heights

The shingle-style house is a culmination of architectural periods and vernaculars which began cropping up during the popular late 19th-century summer destinations such as Cape Cod, Newport, and Long Island. Massive stone masonry foundations anchored free-form two and three-story floors while continuous wood shingles wrapped walls and roofs. Expansive porches offer vacationers shaded areas for family life and socializing. While the unadorned style still finds its origins on the many

coastal regions of New England landscape and even here in the Northwest, it has taken hold in and around the San Juan’s and even inner urban areas like Seattle and Bellevue. The Shingle style is unquestionably one of my favorite types of homes to plan and design. Even though I still grapple in achieving symmetrical purity, the Shingle home, unlike a Palladian or Georgian style, has proven to be forgiving and is willing to embrace asymmetrical practicality. For a variety of reasons, it serves a purpose in function with no sacrifice to

aesthetics. Laurel Hall has an abundance of asymmetrical shingle-style ideas. This style lends itself well to a variety of silhouettes that translate into dramatic roof lines with repetitive dormers and bay windows. The gambrel roofs and shed dormers easily create an additional finished area for second-story terraces. First-floor porches tuck easily beneath the main roof lines and wrap these irregular footprints better than any other traditional architectural style.

Bone River Cottage - Willapa Bay    

Sally sells seashells by the seashore.

She sells seashells on the seashell shore.
The seashells she sells are seashore shells,
Of that I'm sure.

Slated for construction:  2022

She sells seashells by the seashore.
She hopes she will sell all her seashells soon.

If neither he sells seashells
Nor she sells seashells,
Who shall sell seashells?
Shall seashells be sold?

New Commission  |  Laurel Hall  |  A Shingle Style Manor  |  Medina Heights

The shingle-style house is a culmination of architectural periods and vernaculars which began cropping up during the popular late 19th-century summer destinations such as Cape Cod, Newport, and Long Island. Massive stone masonry foundations anchored free-form two and three-story floors while continuous wood shingles wrapped walls and roofs. Expansive porches offer vacationers shaded areas for family life and socializing. While the unadorned style still finds its origins on the many

coastal regions of New England landscape and even here in the Northwest, it has taken hold in and around the San Juan’s and even inner urban areas like Seattle and Bellevue. The Shingle style is unquestionably one of my favorite types of homes to plan and design. Even though I still grapple in achieving symmetrical purity, the Shingle home, unlike a Palladian or Georgian style, has proven to be forgiving and is willing to embrace asymmetrical practicality. For a variety of reasons, it serves a purpose in function with no sacrifice to

aesthetics. Laurel Hall has an abundance of asymmetrical shingle-style ideas. This style lends itself well to a variety of silhouettes that translate into dramatic roof lines with repetitive dormers and bay windows. The gambrel roofs and shed dormers easily create an additional finished area for second-story terraces. First-floor porches tuck easily beneath the main roof lines and wrap these irregular footprints better than any other traditional architectural style.

The Carriage House  |  San Juan Island

The shingle-style house is a culmination of architectural periods and vernaculars which began cropping up during the popular late 19th-century summer destinations such as Cape Cod, Newport, and Long Island. Massive stone masonry foundations anchored free-form two and three-story floors while continuous wood shingles wrapped walls and roofs. Expansive porches offer vacationers shaded areas for family life and socializing. While the unadorned style still finds its origins on the many

coastal regions of New England landscape and even here in the Northwest, it has taken hold in and around the San Juan’s and even inner urban areas like Seattle and Bellevue. The Shingle style is unquestionably one of my favorite types of homes to plan and design. Even though I still grapple in achieving symmetrical purity, the Shingle home, unlike a Palladian or Georgian style, has proven to be forgiving and is willing to embrace asymmetrical practicality. For a variety of reasons, it serves a purpose in function with no sacrifice to

aesthetics. Laurel Hall has an abundance of asymmetrical shingle-style ideas. This style lends itself well to a variety of silhouettes that translate into dramatic roof lines with repetitive dormers and bay windows. The gambrel roofs and shed dormers easily create an additional finished area for second-story terraces. First-floor porches tuck easily beneath the main roof lines and wrap these irregular footprints better than any other traditional architectural style.

Laurel Hall  |  Adds Adjacent Lot  |  Medina Heights  

With the recent purchase of the adjacent lot, Laurel Hall now consists of two Shingle-Style structures connected by an open-air breezeway and a shared motor court. The project is in for permitting and slated to begin construction in January 2021. 

The project team has now been solidified and includes: 

     Project Designer:           The Design Guy

     Project Architect:           Ripple Design Studio

     Interior Design:              Irene Reguera 

     General Contractor:      Bender Construction

     Landscape Architect:    Land Morphology

Some style is legendary

Shingle-Style is one of them

The Design Guy

My goal, as a designer, has always been to make my creative contributions so they will, in some way, enable my clients to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement through the finished product they live within.

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